Save Trinity Centre – how you can help in under two minutes

Trinity could be at risk of closure if plans for flats opposite its doors go ahead unchecked

Win tickets for Teachings in Dub x Deep Medi: The Weekender pt.4

Bristol was recently hit with the gutting news that Trinity Centre is the latest local music venue under threat from residential developments. Fortunately in this case, there is still time to halt these plans in their tracks and protect Trinity’s future as a music venue.  

Developers have put forward plans for 12 new flats directly opposite Trinity Centre

Developers have put forward plans for 12 new flats directly opposite Trinity Centre; and if they get those plans in under the radar, they will not be held responsible for adequate sound proofing – despite setting up camp less than 200 yards from the home of sound system nights in Bristol. 

As well as being home to Teachings in Dub, Deep Medi and Planet Shroom, Trinity is the first port of call for takeovers from labels with bassweight at the forefront, recently hosting the likes of Tectonic and Symmetry. The renovated church also provides the perfect natural acoustics for regular live gigs from country to hip hop.

as we’ve already seen too many times, irresponsible developments that don’t acknowledge a pre-existing venue will lead to noise complaints

Unfortunately, as we’ve already seen too many times in Bristol, irresponsible developments that don’t acknowledge a pre-existing venue will lead to noise complaints from future residents – putting Trinity Centre’s future under serious threat of closure.  

Anyone can object to these plans and Trinity are asking their supporters to take two minutes to help secure its future.

‘Trinity has been a home for music and sound system culture since 1976’ says Trinity Centre director Emma Harvey. ‘As with many venues in Bristol and across the country, we face a growing challenge being located in an inner-city area that is becoming more and more residential. 

‘We want to sustain the things that make Bristol an exciting city that people want to call their home. This proposed development is less than 200 yards from Trinity’s front doors; regardless of any sound-proofing, it will undoubtedly lead to noise complaints from new residents. We’re urging music lovers of the city to object to applications like this, which threaten our city’s musical future.’

if you want to object the plans but aren’t sure what to write, Trinity has put together a brief cut-and-paste statement that can be used

Of course, objecting planning applications is not something most of us have experience in, so if you want to object the plans but aren’t sure what to write, Trinity has put together a brief cut-and-paste statement that can be used below: 

Reason for objection:

I would like to object to the recently resubmitted planning application reference 18/06186/F (previous reference: 17/04953/F) for the following reason:- 

Insufficient Mitigation of Noise for New Dwellings (Agent of Change Principle)

The Noise Impact Statement is from Nov 2016 and there have been no revisions of this report since this application was last submitted. The report makes no reference to the fact that the development will be right next to an existing live music venue (est. 1976).

Therefore, no mitigating actions have been taken in relation to its proximity to the Trinity Centre and there is no acknowledgement or awareness of the proposed Agent of Change Principle.

Submit your objection here: planningonline.bristol.gov.uk/online-applications/PIUH2NDNFUW00

The deadline for objections is 2 February 2019. You can help even further by sharing this with any music-loving friends who would like to see Trinity Centre running as a music venue long into the future. 

Photos by Khali Ackford.

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3 Comments

  1. Avatar
    carmel choron
    December 22, 2018
    Reply

    a great space and place for so long communities should not be sacrificed for developers pockets

  2. Avatar
    louie whiting
    December 22, 2018
    Reply

    keep this amazing venue going. To many clubs are being closed down and they are a poignant part of the uk music scene.

  3. Avatar
    Rachel
    January 9, 2019
    Reply

    I am 58 and have been attending brilliant gigs and more at Trinity for nearly 40 years. It is one of Bristol’s best known venues and helps make Bristol so popular.

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