On the hottest June day recorded in 40 years, Colston Hall’s main hall filled with 2,000 sweaty people awaiting Tennessee punk-pop heroes Paramore, who are back after a four-year break.

Tickets went on sale at the end of April, with the fairly steep £45+ ticket price clearly not putting too many people off; fans managed to crash the Colston Hall website in a ticket frenzy and the venue had to open their doors to physical buyers to abate the baying crowds.

fans managed to crash the Colston Hall website in a ticket frenzy and the venue had to open their doors to physical buyers to abate the baying crowds

The demand for the band was so intense, in fact, that online ticket touts including StubHub were extorting £100+ for resale tickets (£200+ for those unlucky enough to live in London).

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

While we were initially disappointed to be away from the main action with seated balcony tickets, our bums didn’t even touch our seats, heading straight to the front of the balcony to jump around with several other would-be stall ticket holders, looking down over the sweaty, partially topless masses.

our bums didn’t even touch our seats, heading straight to the front of the balcony to jump around with several other would-be stall ticket holders

Pop-punk’s most iconic frontwoman Hayley Williams had zero trouble projecting the live atmosphere all the way up to the balconies, so we didn’t feel like we were missing out on anything but soggy shoulders.

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

An opening song (Told You So) from their 2017 album After Laughter went down a storm with everyone, whether because they are fans of the new album or because it’s the first time Paramore have played Bristol since 2008, it was hard to tell.

the whole place erupting in a thunderous clap-along to the song’s crescendo: ‘bah-da-da buh-da-da-da-da…’

They quickly wound the clock back ten years to follow up with That’s What You Get from their breakthrough album RIOT!, before working their way back to some new material via a few classics, including Still Into You and Brick by Boring Brick – the whole place erupting in a thunderous clap-along to the song’s crescendo: ‘bah-da-da buh-da-da-da-da…’

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

Seemingly sensitive to the fact that a large portion of ticket holders were long-time fans, every foray into the new album was cushioned on either side by songs from older albums.

There was also an outing for their lesser-known Twilight B-Side track I Caught Myself, and a disco-infused cover of Fleetwood Mac’s Everywhere – a moment no more special than for this happy couple who got engaged midway through.

every foray into the new album was cushioned on either side by songs from older albums

// READ MORE: GALLERY – PARAMORE AT COLSTON HALL //

The new album is undoubtedly (and unavoidably, in our current musical climate) more electro-poppy than their previous five albums, but Hayley maintains a punky (/noughties emo) attitude – representing the old skool in some black and white checked, skinny flares.

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger
The getup makes her stage acrobatics all the more impressive, as she leaps around the stage and wrestles with the mic like it’s circa 2007 – reminding everyone what good fun live music used to be.

The getup makes her stage acrobatics all the more impressive, as she leaps around the stage and wrestles with the mic like it’s circa 2007 – reminding everyone what good fun live music used to be

Without a doubt there are still plenty of bands who know how to rock out a stage, but Paramore was the last time this showmanship was part of the mainstream. The better part of the last decade has fed us a steady diet of electronic music, where projected visuals and flashing lights are the main spectacle on stage (coming even from a big electronic fan like myself, who had to make a difficult call on whether to see Bonobo instead, who was playing the same night around the corner at Lloyd’s Amphitheatre).

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

Paramore finished the main part of their set with probably their best-known track Misery Business, hoisting two fans up on stage, who, after a quick guitar lesson for one of them and mic handover for the other, absolutely nailed their moment of glory to a huge applause from the delighted auditorium.

Paramore finished the main part of their set with probably their best-known track Misery Business, hoisting two fans up on stage

The encore brought two more songs from After Laughter, Forgiveness and Hard Times, plus another mic handover. This time, to Paramore founding member Zac Farro, who recently re-joined the band full time after his departure seven years ago, treating us to a cover of Scooby’s in the Back from his solo project HalfNoise.

Paramore at Colston Hall-Nitelife-Dominika Scheibinger

Leaving the concert, the good moods of everybody spilling out of Paramore and Bonobo at the same time seemed to converge and lead to an impromptu party on the Harbourside, with what felt like hundreds of people dancing around a rigged-up busker by the fountains. Topping off one of the most memorable live shows I’ve seen in a while.

Photography by Dominika Schiebinger

// READ MORE: GALLERY – PARAMORE AT COLSTON HALL // 

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