The World Cup may be over but last Monday night at the Trinity, nationalities from all over the world were represented through the medium of music by one man and his band. Following on from his headline live show last March, The Colston Hall announced that Will Holland aka Quantic would return to Bristol for an evening of border hopping, energetic, talent laden entertainment.

It took approximately zero seconds for the sold-out crowd to get into full voice however soon after the opener a technical issue with the frontman’s guitar resulted in a 10 minute hiatus. Shit happens. Undeterred, Quantic and the band began the set in earnest, rewarding die-hard fans with classics like Tropidelico and Time is Enemy as well as showcasing new material. Some so new that their names were still being decided.

Quantic is a smooth yet modest frontman whilst on stage so the responsibility of showmanship was put firmly on the music as the band jammed around well-known classics and new songs alike, giving true fans of music a gift that’s not always expected when bigger names hit the stage.

From the beginning, this was embodied by the keyboardist’s incredible and sometimes obscure solos and later by the rest of the band in turn

From the beginning, this was embodied by the keyboardist’s incredible and sometimes obscure solos and later by the rest of the band in turn. I’ve never actually heard an accordion solo before, but now I’ve seen at least three. Quantic switching at Will (pun intended) between guitar, synthesiser and accordion showcased his musical prowess. Tunes like the accordion-heavy Hotline Bling getting the feet moving nicely.

The constant transitioning from Latino, to Afro-Cuban to funk and beyond resonated with an enthusiastic room who were all linked by the talent musicians’ ability to get the crowd moving. The gig was one of the liveliest I’ve seen in a while and for good reason, it was an incredible performance. Oh and did I mention it was a Monday? 

it was South American-inspired hits such as Cumbia Sobre el Mar and Panama City that really helped the Trinity hit boiling point

The electronic influence picked up during the middle of the set with new titles such as Doombia being performed as the temperature rose, but it was South American-inspired hits such as Cumbia Sobre el Mar and Panama City that really helped the Trinity hit boiling point.

As you’d expect it was one of those night that will long live in the memory of the ticket holders, with an impressive band being given plenty of freedom to experiment around Quantic’s legendary ability to compose music of the highest quality across a remarkable spectrum of genres. Hopefully it won’t be too long before his name appears on a poster in Bristol again – in case you missed out.

Words by Callum Rees
Photos by Dominika Scheibinger 

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