Their sound has been described as infectious and genre-bending, and they’ve made Bristol their playground in 2019. Despite only having two single releases under their belts at this moment in time, Bristol trio INDIGOs look set to be the latest products of BIMM’s impressive conveyer belt of talent.

the illegitimate lovechild of Pixies, Smashing Pumpkins and The Brian Jonestown Massacre

Consisting of guitarists and vocalists Sophia and Jack, and drummer Jack, the band have been dubbed ‘the illegitimate lovechild of Pixies, Smashing Pumpkins and The Brian Jonestown Massacre’, and received rave reviews for their recent performance at Dot to Dot and at The Lanes while supporting Crocodiles.

The band’s debut EP is set to be released in September, and with Sophia being an alumni of BIMM Bristol’s songwriting course, INDIGOs are put under the spotlight for the next in our BIMM Future Talent series.

Can you describe your sound?
It’s like a nostalgia mashup, heavy pop vibe; there’s a lot of shoegaze and grunge in there, but we keep everything melodic and focus on the dual vocal.

Who or what do you take inspiration from?
We’re influenced by a huge range of stuff, the influences that are most obvious when you hear the tracks are 90s alternative rock and shoegaze, but we’re all really into trip-hop and psychedelic rock. 

we’re all really into trip-hop and psychedelic rock

Have you got some examples of your music we can listen to?
We’ve got two singles out currently, Breathe In and Rebirth are both on Spotify. Our next EP is currently being mixed and we’re about to record some more stuff soon, so there’s plenty in the pipeline.

Have you got any shows or releases lined up?
We’re releasing our debut EP in September, we’re really excited to have more of our music out there. Up until now we’ve only had those two singles out and there’s only so much momentum you can get going. 

The live show is really working for us now and our writing is improving massively
It’s been really useful though in a sense, as it’s given us time to find our sound and integrate our new drummer to the band; the live show is really working for us now and our writing is improving massively as well. 

the live show is really working for us now and our writing is improving

It feels like we’ve got everything in place to have a big year in 2020. There can be a temptation to rush at this stage, but I feel like we’ve avoided that – it seems like we’re moving at a really organic pace that feels natural for us.

Does living in Bristol influence your music?
Definitely, Bristol is such a good place to be creative and there are so many different scenes. Musicians here seem to be really welcoming and there’s so much interplay between musicians from very different genres. 

Audiences here seem to be really receptive to quite experimental or non-mainstream music as well, which is so important. It feels like there’s a real public interest in art that is very inspiring. 

Audiences here seem to be really receptive to quite experimental or non-mainstream music

INDIGOs Bristol interview

I think it’s because of this that the artists coming out of Bristol seem to have so much integrity – they all do their own thing and are confident in themselves and their niche, which is why there’s been so much influential stuff from here.

trip hop shaped our sound, but IDLES have been a massive influence

Specifically, I think trip hop has really shaped our sound, but IDLES have been a massive influence for us – more from a lyrical and subject matter perspective. 

READ MORE >> IDLES CHOOSE LOVE ON THEIR NEW ALBUM, JOY AS AN ACT OF RESISTANCE

Why did you decide to pursue a professional qualification in music?
Having a career in music is one of the most difficult things you can try to do – I would only ever recommend it if you really love it. 

BIMM seemed like the obvious choice for meeting people and fast-tracking through all of the things you need to know about the music industry before you start. You get a great network and a lot of sound advice.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learnt at BIMM?
Songwriting is the key! Also that networking and branding are so important, you can’t just do what you want and hope you get picked up by a label. If you really want it, you have to create opportunities for yourself.

Where do you hope to be in your career in five years?
I guess we’re not really thinking that far ahead. Obviously we’d like to make enough money from the band to not need day jobs, and we feel like we’re good enough to get to that level if we play our cards right. But, as I said, I think there’s a real temptation to rush ahead to getting signed or touring America, and not really enjoying the process or making sure you’re doing each step right as you go. 

we’re good enough to get to that level if we play our cards right

At the moment we’re focused on continuing to improve our songwriting and making sure that everything we release is a step up from the last. We’ve got a lot of material that we haven’t released yet, so we’re going to spend the next year or so building a solid fanbase in Bristol and London and go from there regarding publishing and labels – not sure there’s any other way!

Photos by Dominika Scheibinger

soundcloud.com/indigos-bristol
@indigos_bristol

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