Noisily: A haven of underground electronic music for conscientious people

Noisily festival gears up for round four this July

With less than a month to go, Noisily festivals organiser’s are gearing up for round four this July. With its intimate capacity of four thousand, it’s already made a name for itself as a haven for underground electronic music for conscientious people who want to party.

a haven for underground electronic music for conscientious people who want to party

With its beautiful location deep in a hilly valley, Nosily is situated in Nosely Hall in Coney Woods just north of Market Harborough, Leicestershire. Noisily’s ethos is based on five key pillars of inclusion: respect for the environment, wellness, education, community and creativity. 

Noisily prides itself on its welcoming and inclusive atmosphere where everyone feels like family, and lifelong friendships are formed. There is a strong focus on spiritual and holistic practices aimed at improving the mind, as well as art, performance art and all other kinds of theatrical weirdness.

art, performance art and all other kinds of theatrical weirdness 

Nosily has managed to drastically decrease their eco-footprint and they aim to spread awareness and respect for the environment. They’ve banned the use of single use plastic across all traders and bars, and encourage attendees to bring their own reusable bottles. 

There are three main stages: The Noisily stage, featuring techno and all things house; The Liquid stage, hosting psytrance DJs from all over the globe and The Treehouse stage, home of drum and bass, glitch and neuro. There are two smaller stages, the Leisure Centre playing aggressive basslines, and newest addition The Parliament of Funk, playing funk, soul and disco tracks to keep you smiling till the wee hours. Noisily has a late license and music goes on till 6am on Friday and Saturday night.

music goes on till 6am on Friday and Saturday night 

The awe inspiring lineup features artists from all over the world, some who rarely play in the UK. Headliners are German minimal techno and neo-trance duo Extrawelt, and Captain Hook bringing us psytance all the way from Israel. From the UK are 90s stalwart LTJ Bukem known for his jazz-enthused atmospheric drum and bass, and Mad Professor playing some delectable dub. 

Mad Professor playing some delectable dub

Mad professor has collaborated with Lee Scratch Perry, Horace Andy and Jah Shaka, and was one of the pioneers of the second generation of dub; this should be one hell of a set to look out for.  

The more eclectic bassline connoisseurs have a banquet of brain melting beats to feast upon. Almost every electronic genre is represented at Noisily. Other acts not to miss include Opiuo from New Zealand equipped with his eclectic blend of glitch hop fused with future funk, among other genres. Hospital record’s S.P.Y from Sao Paul, Brazil comes armed with his house, garage, jungle inspired DnB. 

Almost every electronic genre is represented at Noisily

Fabio Leal brings us his blend of psy and tek-infused house and Alex Stein will be bringing the techno. Representing Bristol, Audio Gutter and Hurt Deer will be delivering some glitchy mutant bass. Trance heads should make sure to catch Waio for some psy-trance, and Slackbaba for some trippy psy-dub.

Representing Bristol, Audio Gutter and Hurt Deer will be delivering some glitchy mutant bass

You can expect to see an array of fire performers, hula hoopers, jugglers and all sorts of other circus acts to delight the senses. From tea ceremonies, to dance and singing workshops, to yoga, meditation and talks on plant medicine and massage, there’s much on offer for the more wholesome punter. 

Boutique camping is available for all of those who need a proper nest to recuperate. Head to Noisily to free yourself, body and soul, getting playful on the dance floor with your best friends.

Words by Charise Clarke
Photo by Sauriêl Creative Photography

Nosily – 11-15 July, Leicestershire
Tickets // noisilyfestival.com

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